Indoor Air Quality Monitoring

Good indoor air quality will enhance the health and comfort condition of the people who live or work within a given building. Failure to respond to indoor air quality issues may result in the following:

  • Recurring health problems.
  • Increased absenteeism resulting in reduced workplace productivity.
  • Damage to surrounding furnishings and the premature failing of electrical items.
  • Increased tension between staff, management and/or maintenance personnel.
    .

Ph Water Technologies typical Indoor Air Quality Assessment will consist of the following:

Assess the effectiveness of air filter in removing particle contamination by monitoring the air pre and post filters for particles per cubic foot at levels of 0.5, 1.0 , 2.0 and 5.0 microns.

  1. Measure the quantity and size of airborne particles being supplied by the ventilation system from supply grilles located in representative positions. Readings to be provided for particles per cubic foot at levels of 0.5, 1.0 , 2.0 and 5.0 microns.
  2. Identify the levels of airborne microorganisms being supplied by ventilation system from supply grilles located in representative positions. Readings to be provided as total colony counts for standard volume of air.
  3. Measure the levels of appropriate gases at all floor levels e.g. carbon dioxide in re–circulated air, ozone adjacent to photocopiers and carbon monoxide in enclosed car parking areas. Readings to be provided as parts per million.
  4. Inspect the ventilation plant to assess its condition and standard of maintenance with regard to air quality.
  5. A detailed report shall be provided with each set of results detailing methods used to provide the results, stating all control limits and making any recommendations appropriate

Measurement of thermal comfort, which incorporates air temperature, relative humidity, and air velocities within the occupied areas are compared with established acceptable levels.

Carbon dioxide levels within the working environment give an indication as to whether the fresh air rate supplied is in sufficient quantity to remove unpleasant odours and other internally generated pollutants. Noxious gases such as carbon monoxide, ozone and formaldehyde.

Measurement of airborne particulate levels within the workplace. Comparison with acceptable levels and between various locations within the same building.

Airborne bacteria and fungal contamination levels within the office areas. These are compared to recognised guidelines within CIBSE TM26:2000. The data also helps to locate the source of the problem.

footer-logos